Zimbabweans say Government is Performing Badly on Addressing Youth Needs

The latest Afrobarometer research highlights the progress made by government in addressing the needs of youths, who constitute a significant portion of the population. According to the majority of interviewees the government is not doing enough to address challenges faced by youths in the country. Read on to get the full findings of the survey.

Most Zimbabweans say the government is doing a poor job of addressing the needs of young people, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows. A majority of citizens also say they would support a government decision to make people pay more taxes in order to help young people. Further, they say job creation should be the top priority for additional investment if the government were to increase its spending on programs to help young people.

Key findings

  • More than three-quarters (77%) of Zimbabweans say the government is performing badly in terms of addressing young people’s needs. Negative assessments of the government’s performance on youth are particularly widespread among urban residents (80%), men (81%), and supporters of the MDC-Chamisa party (95%). More than seven out of 10 of citizens across all age categories express the same sentiment.
  • Almost six in 10 citizens (58%) say they would support a government decision to make people pay more taxes in order to support programs to help young people. Support for more taxes for youth programs is stronger among women (61%) than men (55%), among ZANU-PF adherents (63%) than MDC-Chamisa supporters (49%), and among rural residents (63%) than their urban counterparts (49%). Citizens with post-secondary education (52%) are least likely to endorse higher taxes to support programs to help young people.
  • If the government were to increase its spending on programs to help young people, job creation would be citizens’ top priority for additional investment, followed by education (14%) and job training (14%).

Read the full report here (182KB PDF)

Source: Mass Public Opinion Institute

Share this update

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

Liked what you read?

We have a lot more where that came from!
Join 36,000 subscribers who stay ahead of the pack.

Related Updates

Related Posts:

Categories

Categories

Authors

Author Dropdown List

Archives

Archives

Focus

All the Old News

If you’re into looking backwards, visit our archive of over 25,000 different documents from 2000-2013.