Zimbabwe’s current problems: Kubatana members speak out

Source: 26 August 2019Analysis and Comment, Democracy

We recently shared four opinion pieces by Brian Raftopoulos, Fadzayi Mahere, Sibusiso B. Moyo and Tendai Biti, each sharing their take on Zimbabwe’s current problems, and how to solve them. We invited feedback from our members. Here is what people had to say . . .

I think Zimbabwe’s problems are being caused by corruption and not sanctions. Selective application of the law has rendered our judiciary useless in most cases when we go against those connected to the powers that be. Through corruption, the citizenry has lost confidence in the banking sector and all the other sectors of the economy, hence high illicit flows of revenue away from official channels. By addressing corruption even through asset forfeiture laws for those caught we can go a long way bringing this country on the right track and investors can start rolling in. I think for us to move, we need new horses on the track. Old horses there to train new horses dzisapaparike chete. That’s my opinion. In soccer we have Zidane, here in Zimbabwe tinawo hobho vakatamba soccer zvakanyanya but today are coaching. Why, simply because havasisina simba rekumhanya muground and are now sharing their skills through coaching.
– via WhatsApp

Less words and more action is all we need really. Talk is cheap.
– via WhatsApp

I concur with the learned Tendai Biti’s diagnosis of the problems and his synopsis of solutions; ‘as is.’ I also concur with Fadzayi’s contention to re-democratize the civil space in the fabric of the Zimbabwe society and in echelons of power politics and administration: “It is time for the UK and Europe, who backed Mnangagwa, to stand with democratic forces and innocent, brutalized citizens – not a corrupt authoritarian regime incapable of reforming politically and economically.” As a Christian professional, I contend that prayers have been offered up to the throne room of grace the week before the proposed MDC-led demonstrations and I declare and decree: As long as the Lord God of Israel before whom I stand, somewhere sometime and in some way the divine hand will intervene and usher the transformation the people of Zimbabwe so deserve and hope for.
Arthur, via email

For best results call for new free and fair elections without intimidation and move on from there. The world will now invest in Zimbabwe. Root out all corruption all corrupt elements should answer for their deeds.
– via WhatsApp

I have read articles by Brian Raftopoulos, Fadzai Mahere, S. B Moyo and Tendai Biti on what went wrong and what needs to be done in order to solve Zimbabwe’s current problems. There is normally a lot of sense when you read what is written. I remember at school we would get same marks after writing a composition on same topic but different stories. This means that usually there is some sense in what is written. What those authors wrote has a lot of sense. Real sense but useless. They are all describing the same beast but at different times of day, morning, afternoon, dusk and midnight. Politicians will always say sweet things, political analysts will always say what they see missing from what has been said or done by politicians. Ordinary people will never see things the same way, but their voice is a true reflection of the situation on the ground. I am one ordinary person with a true reflection of the current situation.

Majority of us (the ordinary), now hate politics and politicians in particular for what they bring upon us. Zimbabwe’s current problems will never go away as long as we have the current crop of politicians both in Zanu PF and the MDC A. We have leaders who want power at every cost. Let me remind you about this, we all thought and believed that former President Mugabe was forced to resign. This was especially after watching on state television, the inauguration ceremony of president Mnangagwa which was attended by opposition political leaders. It was after some events, including the last election that we started hearing that it was a coup that dislodged former president. My biggest question is; at what point did the opposition realized it was a coup? Were they part of the coup that brought President Mnangagwa to power? Were they promised something in return? Did they get what they were promised? Is it not a sign of selfishness that the opposition now talk of Mnangagwa’s legitimacy when they actually blessed his inauguration after November 17?

To say the truth, MDC A will celebrate the economic meltdown as long as they are outside government. Mnangagwa’s administration will act brutally on opposition demonstrations because they know very well what the opposition wants to see. It is like one is saying; “You will never run this economy,” while the other one is saying; “You will never be a president of this country.”

So, that’s where the biggest problem is. That’s where the solution lies as well. If those two gentlemen speak with one voice, in 2 weeks’ time, we will start to see signs of change economically. Self re-engagement is what is lacking.
– Collen Hwara, Kadoma

We need a genuine dialogue for all political parties and stakeholders.
– Mukanya, via WhatsApp

I think Biti’s opinion makes more sense than the other three articles. At this point political players should come to terms with negotiation and agree on how they can turn around the fortunes of this country. United we stand, divided we fall so those political players should agree on what needs to be reformed and bring back USD to stabilize the situation then later on they will introduce stabilization programs.
– Erick, via WhatsApp

The current political and economical climate and the further worsening of the same, will inevitably bring about two things. #division/ conflicts within the ruling party concerning which route to take in solving the worsening crisis. #removal from office of the president by impeachment. That’s my opinion.
– via WhatsApp

In short, the Zanu PF we knew during the Mugabe era is the same Zanu PF operating now over a facade New Dawn. It won’t change whilst these dead horses are there. Maybe for the good of Zimbabwe these people must go because they have nothing new to offer in this country. This clown who believes removing sanctions will enhance growth in protecting human rights, that’s a mad thing. The only solution to the removal of sanctions is to fully respect our constitution. For someone to say we have got $4million to compensate white farmers whilst the total compensation arrear is about US$9 billion is clearly a sign of a visionless leader. Our country needs new ideas, from new faces to progress. ZANU PF represents a system of corruption, misrule, dictatorship and it won’t change.
– via WhatsApp

Yes there is a need for dialogue in Zimbabwe but it is the implementation of it that is wrong. Mr Mnangagwa has called for dialogue and peace in the country but should first consider this: Zimbabwe is in a conflict or crisi situation since the July 30 harmonised elections. Soldiers killed people in Harare on 1 August and in January, last month crimes against humanity were committed by state forces. Peace cannot just come on a silver platter Mr Mnanagagwa. Peace is a product of negotiations. Peace is a product of mediation. Peace a product of reconcilliation and forgiveness. Peace is a product of truth telling. Zimbabwe desperately needs transitional justice. What we have in Zimbabwe is negative peace. Now Mr Mnangagwa should be reminded that dialogue in Zimbabwe requires mediation od SADC, AU and even EU. A mediator is supposed to be appointed to facilitate dialogue. Dialogue cannot transpire with Mr Mnangagwa assuming the role of ‘big brother’ in the negotiations. He is supposed to eat a humble pie and derole as he is also one of the 23 candidates who took part in the disputed elections. He should not be seen inviting other candidates to the negotiation table. The neutral mediators should invite the warring parties to the table for negotiation and not him dictating the pace of the negotiations. He should remember the GNU in 2009. It was a negotiated enterprise with mediators.
– Gilbert, Chitungwiza

Source: Kubatana subscribers