Zimbabwe Lockdown: Day 631– WCOZ Situation Report

631 days of the COVID-19 Lockdown, and as of 19th of December 2021, the Ministry of Health and Child Care reported that, the cumulative number of COVID-19 cases had increased to 192 796 after 1 123 new cases all local cases, were recorded. The highest case tally was recorded in Matebeleland South with 200 cases. We note that the Hospitalisation rate data as at 15:00hrs on 18 December 2021, 296 hospitalised cases: 24 New Admissions, 36 Asymptomatic cases, 217 mild-to-moderate cases, 39 severe cases and 4 cases in Intensive Care Units. A total of 6 146 people received their 1st doses of vaccine. The cumulative number of the 1st dose vaccinated now stands at 4 053 889. A total of 5 592 recipients received their second dose bringing the cumulative number of 2nd dose recipients to 3 069 526. Active cases went up to 49 612. The total number of recoveries went up to 138 397 increasing by 2 642 recoveries. The recovery rate goes up to 74%. The death toll went up to 4 787 after 5 new deaths were recorded.

Critical Emerging Issue

Increased Risk of Infection with Night Life

We spotlight issues pertaining from increased nightlife and recreational activities this festive seasons. Our rapid report from this weekend, highlights concerns regarding increased risks of infections through nightlife activities. We are concerned in particular, by of lack of social distancing, consumption of alcohol in a shared manner and reduced adherence to both mask wearing and sanitisation in night clubs, pubs and other places of entertainment at night. We are concerned furthermore by reports indicating high levels of congestions in nightspots in Bulawayo, Harare, Gweru and Mutare. The reports of liquor stores where persons are both purchasing and consuming alcohol on the premises without regard to cCOVID-19 control measures is also of concern as reflected in our reports from Chinhoyi, Kwekwe, Gwanda, and Kariba.

  • We call for stricter enforcement of COVID-19 control measures in nightspots as these can fuel outbreaks during the festive season.

Outstanding Issues

Persons Living and Working on the Streets

We note the infections of COVID-19 that are presently in a spike which is occurring during a reported increase in flue cases. We accordingly draw attention to orphan and vulnerable children in particular those living on the streets. Furthermore, we draw attention on families and persons living on working in the streets who struggle to access health care services. We raise concerns with the recent rains that have increased the distress of families living and working in the streets. Furthermore, we note with concern the limited support through social welfare support services to actively reach out, test for the COVID-19 and administer vaccines to this critical and vulnerable community which is at high risk of COVID-19.

We call for direct support by health care teams working in tandem with social welfare community case care workers to reach out to families living In in the streets to provide COVID-19 checks and health support for needs assessed.

We continue to call for a full public report on the status of the persons in living and working on the streets their housing and their reunifications processes and measures to ensure that they are sufficiently able to access safeguarding mechanisms against COVID-19.

We urge the announcement of mechanisms to protect those living and working on the streets against the spread of the virus, which includes a progress report on the vaccine roll-out targeting this special group.

Source: Women’s Coalition of Zimbabwe

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