Development-Induced Displacements in Zimbabwe: Learning from Colonial and Post-Colonial Experiences

The Centre for Conflict Management and Transformation has launched a book providing a historical perspective on development induced displacements in Zimbabwe from colonial to post-colonial periods. The book analyses relevant policy frameworks and propose ways in which challenges could be addressed bringing together perspectives from different stakeholders and institutions on the need to address the challenges of development induced displacements in a comprehensive manner. Read on for more.

Rural communities face increasing risks of being displaced by infrastructure development projects (e.g. dams, roads, transmission lines), urban expansion into rural areas, or large-scale commercial projects (e.g. mining, timber and agribusiness). Development-induced displacements (DID) may lead to loss of land, livelihoods, property, and access to social facilities, natural resources and cultural heritage sites, if the affected people are not adequately protected and compensated.

The policies of the Government of Zimbabwe are geared towards rural development, economic growth and foreign investment. This calls for a complementing review and harmonisation of legislation, policies and procedures designed to protect the rights and livelihoods of rural communities physically or economically displaced by development projects.

In 2019, the Centre for Conflict Management and Transformation (CCMT) hosted a series of multi-stakeholder policy dialogues on the issue of development-induced displacements in Zimbabwe. In addition, a research symposium was held in collaboration with the Tugwi Mukosi Multidisciplinary Research Institute (TMMRI, Midlands State University) on Zimbabwean displacement experiences and policy options. This book, with contributions from a wide range of researchers and practitioners, presents the results of that process.

The book provides a historical perspective on DIDs in Zimbabwe from colonial to post-colonial periods and explores common features and challenges in a variety of cases from dam constructions to mining and urban development. The contributing authors analyze relevant policy frameworks and propose ways in which challenges could be addressed. The book brings together perspectives from different stakeholders and institutions showcasing a broad consensus about the need to address the challenges of DIDs in a comprehensive manner.

Read the full book here (4MB PDF)

Source: Centre for Conflict Management and Transformation

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